Orofluido Oil – Product Review

What is Orofluido?
Orofluido, created and marketed by The Colomer Group, is the Colomer Group’s answer to MoroccanOil. MoroccanOil is a trademarked name of another hair oil product that carries Argan Oil.

Orofluido has less ingredients than MoroccanOil, and seems to have less toxic ingredients (MoroccanOil ingredients range from 0-8, while Orofluido ranges from 0-6 – I get this information from Skin Deep, The Environmental Working Group’s cosmetic safety database). This is a plus in my book. Also, I noticed that Orofluido has more than just Argan Oil in it, but I’m hoping this is a plus and not a negative (meaning I’m hoping for less chemical fillers and more oil, the ingredients in MoroccanOil are mostly various silicones). I haven’t tried MoroccanOil yet.

I first tried Orofluido about 3-4 months ago because the salon that I purchase my Miss Jessie’s supplies near my job was giving away samples. Since I had never heard of Orofluido, I went online to get more information.

From the website:
Orofluido has its inspiration in the beauty rituals of ancient traditions:

The Berber women who live in Morocco have taught us to protect and care for our hair with the prized Argan oil. The beauty secrets of Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt and still a symbol of seduction today, included a treatment based on Cyperus oil, which left her hair smooth, shiny and velvety to the touch. Linseed oil was used by Egyptians, Hebrews and Phoenicians alike as an incredible source of shine for hair.

Orofluido is a treatment that provides a remarkable silkiness, lightness and shine.

A beauty elixir for all hair types, with a pure luxuriance which envelops your hair. Three organic natural oils in an exquisite mixture with a pleasant, silky texture, absorbed rapidly and leaving no residue in the hair. Non-rinse treatment for all hair types.

TEXTURE
Fluid, silky and pleasant to the senses, reminiscent and evocative of the treasured gold.

FRAGRANCE
Its delicious amber fragrance with a vanilla foundation will transport you into a fascinating world of oriental perfume.

Pour some drops of Orofluido onto the palms of your hands and apply onto damp, towel-dried hair, dosing the quantity according to hair type, length and thickness.
Use it on dry hair to discipline and add instant shine: its silky texture is rapidly absorbed, and doesn’t add weight or leave residues in the hair. Do not rinse

APPLIED TO DAMP HAIR:
• Reduces brushing/drying time
• Leaves hair light, silky and easy to comb
• Gives hair body and movement
• Enhances the shine of the hair

APPLIED TO DRY HAIR:
• Exceptional and instant shine
• Controls frizzing and makes combing easier
• Leaves hair soft, disciplined and flexible

An Exquisite Mixture of Natural Oils

Argan oil: liquid gold for your hair
Extracted from the seeds of the Argania spinosa fruit, Argan oil is rich in vitamin E and essential fatty oils, similar in composition to our own skin. It strengthens hair and makes it extremely light and incredibly silky.

Linseed oil: instant shine
The seeds of the linen plant are the source of a precious oil which seals and smooths the hair cuticle, providing uniformity and control. The result is hair that captures and reflects the light, giving it a spectacular shine.

Cyperus oil: pure silk to the touch
Cyperus is a plant that has been cultivated in Egypt for more than 4,000 years. It is the source of an oil with a high content of fatty acids and tocopherol, which give natural protection against free radicals. It provides softness and volume, leaving hair manageable, smooth and flexible.


The first thing I noticed about Orofluido was the fabulous bottle it comes in. I love the design, I love how the color of the oil pops against the black scroll of the bottle design and the black of the packaging box. I also love the fact that it comes with 3 small samples for you to give your friends. The other wonderful thing about Orofluido is the color. It is a beautiful shade of amber that you normally don’t see in oils any more. When I opened the sample bottle, I noticed that the oil had a heavy musk scent – it is strong but hard to immediately identify. I’m not a big fan of heavy fragrance so I was a little dismayed to find the musk was so strong. The scent notes die out after a few hours, however. By the end of the day, it is pretty impossible for me to smell.

Upon pouring Orofluido, one of the things I noticed was the thickness of the oil. Most oils, especially for hair, are much thinner than this – Orofluido pours very thick and slow. It also has a very silky feel, I can see why it claims to smooth frizzy hair.

I’ve been using Orofluido for about 3-4 months now and I really like it. I don’t like it very much more than other oils – with one exception: it does seem to reduce drying time. I have used Orofluido the most on my wet hair. When using on wet hair I noticed that my hair drying time does decrease, both the time sitting under the dryer or air drying. I also love using it on wet hair since the moisture in the hair and the other products I use help mask the scent of the oil.

The only difference that I have noticed when using Orofluido versus regular oil on dry hair is the way Orofluido seems to disappear into the hair and the hands. Once I have finished applying Orofluido and get any excess off of my hands, I do not have an oily sensation nor does my hair feel oily. Other than that, Orofluido seems to react just like other oils. The shine does not seem to be more noticeable than any other oil on dry hair. I think I’ll try it as a hot oil to see what happens.

Final thoughts: While I love the shorter drying time, the lack or oily or sticky feeling, and the thickness of the oil, it is MUCH too expensive for me to purchase on a regular basis.

Cost: $40.00 plus tax*

*I bought this directly from a salon. It is also available from Amazon.com for a lot less.

Locks, locks, and more pictures of locks! (Freakz & Geekz)

The twitter world is abound with tons and tons of people with who have locks and natural hair. One of my favorite tweeps is @FreakzNGeekz. I love her blog because she doesn’t have any cut cards – she gets right to the heart of the matter. Make sure to check her out! Her latest post is on the male perspective of Tantric Sex (yum!).

@FreakzNGeekz has been kind enough to share some of the wonderful locked styles she’s had. One of the things I love the most about these photos is that they show the complete versatility of dreadlocks and natural hair.

Always remember: your locked hairstyles are only limited by your imagination.

The Braid-Out
Braid outs are the most simple locked hairstyle that you can accomplish (and the one I wear most often!). It is exactly what it sounds like: you braid your wet natural hair/dreadlocks and then let them dry to set. The setting can be done via a natural air dry or by sitting under a hood dryer for several hours.

When I style my hair in braid outs, I always start with a clean head of hair. After washing and performing maintenance, I separate my hair into sections that are six (6) locks thick – which I then braid into a single plait and secure at the end with a wrapped rubber band/ponytail holder. I shy away from sitting under the dryer on a regular basis, so I almost always allow my hair to dry naturally. This means that I wear my hair (out in public) with my hair set for at least 24-48 hours. This means that it has to look NEAT, not just be functional.

Braid Out

Bantu Knots (Zulu Knots)
Bantu Knots are wonderful, especially if you love textured hair but don’t want the hassle of additional styling (the set of the braid out) or rollers. Bantu Knots, also known as Zulu Knots, are two hairstyles in one. The first style is the knot itself. The second style is the texture the knot sets into your natural hair/locks – it is very similar to what a roller set would look like (without the rollers).

In order to create Bantu Knots, start with a clean head of hair. After washing and maintenance, I usually separate my hair into sections. Like the Braid Out, I find that six (6) locks are plenty but your lock thickness may vary. I take the section of six locks and twist into a large double strand twist. Once twisted, take the twist and make a large knot as tight to the scalp as possible. What you want is a knot that looks like a mini hair bun. Repeat throughout the hair. This may take some practice, so I would suggest trying this a few times when you have plenty of time to devote to your hair. This style can be worn for several days.

Once your hair has dried completely OR you are tired of wearing your Bantu Knots, just take the knots down. Your hair is already styled! I like to finish up by using a small amount of olive oil, Carol’s Daughter’s Lisa’s Hair Elixir or Orofluido oil to coat my locks, especially the ends.

Bantu Knot - Up

Bantu Knot Up - profile

Bantu Knot Up - profile 2

Bantu Knot - Back

Bantu Knot - Down

Pixie Twists
Pixie Twists are also known as Pipe Cleaner Curls. Unlike Braid Outs and Bantu Knots, Pixie Twists require additional equipment: pipe cleaners. The end result of Pixie Curls are very tight ringlets. I have to admit that I don’t wear this style much, my husband isn’t a big fan of tight curls.

As always, start with a clean head of hair. After washing and maintenance, take a pipe cleaner and bend one end upwards. Take your locks (I generally use no more than 1-2 locks per cleaner but it depends on the lock thickness) and begin to wrap them tightly and snugly around the cleaner from the bottom up to the root, making sure to wrap the lock around the cleaner and the hair. Like the Bantu Knots, this style can also be worn for several days to a week, especially if you used pipe cleaners that are close in color to your hair.

Once your hair has dried completely OR you are tired of wearing the pipe cleaners, just take the pipe cleaners out. Your hair is already styled! I like to finish up by using a small amount of olive oil, Carol’s Daughter’s Lisa’s Hair Elixir or Orofluido oil to coat my locks, especially the ends.

*TIP: Pipe cleaners may leave lint that is impossible to see in your hair. Always try to use pipe cleaners that are closest to your hair in color. Try to give the pipe cleaners a gentle cleaning and allow them to dry before using the first time. This should allow you to remove some of the excess lint prior to use.

Pixie Twist: up and with pipe cleaners

Pixie Twist: up and with pipe cleaners2

Pixie Twist: freshly down from pipe cleaners, very tight curl

Pixie Twist as it falls and loosens

Pin Curls
Pin Curls are created by creating large rolled curls throughout the entire head and pinning them down (and together) with hair pins. As with all dreadlock wet sets, Like Pixie Twists, Pin Curls also need additional equipment: hair pins.

Tip: For this style you need hair pins, NOT bobby pins.

Note: I want to start by saying that I have never put Pin Curls in my own hair before, so I only have a visual knowledge of how to do this technique. Since I only have a visual knowledge, I’m going to speak to our lovely model to see if she is willing to guest on this blog with a write up of how she completes both her Pin Curls as well as her braided up-do’s and buns.

Unlike most dreadlock hairstyles, you do not HAVE to start your set with clean, wet hair in order to do this style…although it would be in your best interest. I’m only mentioning this because this is a style that is practical and cute for an unplanned night on the town that does not require hours of washing and maintenance. If you do decide to not to do your Pin Curls as a wet set, please recognize that you will not be able to take advantage of the “secondary style” that comes with most wet sets.

Pin Curl: front

Pin Curl: back

Pin Curl: Profile

Pin Curl: Top

Pin Curl: top2

Pin Curl: out1

Pin Curl: out2

Braided Up’Do’s and Buns
Let me just be honest, I have never learned how to do my hair up. Freakz ‘N Geekz does a wonderful job with up-do’s, so I’m going to cross my fingers and hopes she’s willing to guest blog soon. 🙂

Braided Updo1 (front)

Braided Updo: Profile

Braided Updo: back

Braided Bun: Side and back

Wet Sets and Dreadlocks

A Wet Set is a generic term used to describe a hair style that is created by taking wet hair and allowing it dry in a particular pattern or texture. Each specific type of wet set can have its own name, for example a wet set using rollers to create curls can be called a roller set. Wet sets are great because the drying process creates a tighter, longer lasting pattern (curl, twist, wave, etc) than can be achieved using heat alone on dry hair.

People who have natural hair (kinky) and dreadlocks greatly benefit from the use of wet sets. Natural hair is impossible to style using the typical techniques used on permed or straight hair. Using a wet setting technique allows natural hair wearers the ability to create wonderful styles and textures in their hair, as well as recreate styles that are reminiscent of the permed hairstyles of today.

One of the greatest benefits to using wet sets on dreadlocks and natural hair is what I call the “secondary style.” There are almost always two styles encompassed in every dreadlock wet set (with the exception of roller sets). The primary style is the intended result, the reason for the wet set. In the case of a braid out, the primary style is the crinkled hairstyle accomplished by setting the hair.

Braid Out - Front

Braid Out - Front


The “secondary” style is the set itself. As long as you make sure to set your hair in a deliberate and neat fashion, the set is almost always wearable out in public. With the braid out set below, while I did not style my hair for this photo, later I took some hair pins and pinned my hair into a side bun.

Wet Set Braid Out - back

With practice, patience, and creativity, there is no hairstyle that is impossible for people who have dreadlocks and natural hair. In fact, I would go as far as to argue that natural hair and dreadlocks are MORE versatile than permed hair, as perms strip away the hair’s natural texture and fullness.

All Natural Olive Hot Oil Treatments

In keeping with my October is for Olive Oil theme, let’s talk about hot oil treatments. Olive oil makes a great oil for a hot oil treatment.

One of my regular uses for olive oil is as a hot oil treatment. There are two ways to do a hot oil treatment – and I use both of them. I have a slightly different recipe for hot oil depending if I’m using it on wet or dry hair. If I plan to give my locks a deep condition, I do my hot oil treatment on dry hair. If I do not plan on deep conditioning my locks, I do my hot oil treatment on wet hair. You can give your locks a hot oil treatment weekly.

Wet Hair
I typically only use this treatment is I am NOT going to do a deep condition.

Hot Oil Treatment for wet hair
¼ cup olive oil
1 tsp dried rosemary (you can use fresh, too)
4 drops lavender essential oil
Cheesecloth

Combine the olive oil and rosemary in a small sauce pan on the stove. Heat until oil is boiling. Stir. Add lavender essential oil. Stir. Remove from heat and strain through cheesecloth to remove rosemary pieces. Allow oil to cool to the touch. Rub (not pour!) onto wet, freshly washed hair. Make sure hair is dry enough not to drip. Wrap hair in plastic shower cap or other plastic bag and sit under a hood dryer for 30 minutes. If you do not have a hood dryer, try wetting a towel with hot water and wrapping it around your hair (keeping the bag on). You will have to re-heat the towel with water several times.

Dry Hair
I use this treatment when I plan to give my hair a deep condition.

Hot Oil Treatment for dry hair
¼ cup olive oil
1 tsp dried rosemary (you can use fresh, too)
1 tbsp honey
6 drops lavender essential oil
Cheesecloth

Combine the olive oil, honey, and rosemary in a small sauce pan on the stove. Heat until oil is boiling, remember: the honey will not disappear into the oil. Stir. Add lavender essential oil. Stir. Remove from heat and strain through cheesecloth to remove rosemary pieces. The cheesecloth will hold the honey for a period of time but you do NOT want to strain out the honey, just the rosemary. Allow oil to cool to the touch. Rub (not pour!) onto dry hair. If your dreadlocks are short enough, wrap a wet towel around the hair and sit under a hood dryer for 30 minutes. If your hair is too long for that, wrap hair in plastic shower cap or other plastic bag that has been sprinkled with water inside the cap/bag. If you do not have a hood dryer, wet the towel with hot water, re-heating the towel with water several times.

Once you have completed your hot oil treatment, wash/co-wash hair as normal.

Regal Up-Do

One of the things I want for my blog is to build a huge library of photos of people with dreadlocks and natural styles done specially for formal events. If you can, help me out! Got any pictures of great natural formal hairstyles? Please send me a pic! thenaturalbride@gmail.com

Peezy Headz Salon, GA

One of the first people to send me pictures of their hair was Rachel. Thank you, Rachel! She is rocking a wonderfully regal style. Her locks are medium length and she has it braided into an up do. The loose ends were shaped into a crown. Her stylist is Brittany at the Peezy Headz salon in 5 Points, Atlanta.

(Close Up)Peezy Headz Salon, GA

Doing my own hair (somewhat)

I’ve searched high, I’ve searched low – I can’t find any hair style that I like. I can’t find a natural hair care stylist who I trust to make me look my best. I don’t know why – in 2010 – it should be sooo hard to find a good natural hair care specialist.

I have a wonderful friend, Glenda, who owns a natural hair care salon in NC. If I was in NC I wouldn’t have this problem cause Glenda would be doing my hair. But that’s not the case, I live in the DC Metro area…

I decided it may be a better idea to do my hair myself. It’s not that hard and although I’m not that creative when it comes to hair, I don’t want a crazy complicated style. My fiance likes my hair down and to the side. I like my hair down. No one else’s opinion matters 🙂

I decided to do a short hair trial to see what I could do for myself. I’m going to have to do this again, though. Here are some pictures before I started:



I always start my hair by getting a fine tooth comb and scratching my scalp. I know that it’s not necessary for everyone but I LOVE the way it feels.

After I scratch my scalp, I get ready to wash. I usually do a co-wash but I am currently trying the new Rosemary Mint (?) shampoo and conditioner from Carol’s Daughter. The shampoo is rather thick and since I have dreads I decided it would be a great idea to dilute the shampoo. I squeeze a generous amount inside of one of those open tipped plastic bottles that are used for dying hair – you can get them at any beauty supply shop.

Supplies for Lock Maintainance & Styling

Supplies for Lock Maintainance & Styling

I use just enough hot water to “melt” the shampoo – then I saturate my scalp with the shampoo/water mix while my hair is still dry. It should be thick enough to keep from running into your eyes but watery enough that you can create a lather by rubbing the hair and scalp. I like to do this (I call it a dry shampoo) before wetting my entire head. This give me the opportunity to do a good scalp cleansing before I start my actual wash.

After I saturate my hair with my shampoo/water mixture, I wash my hair. After I wash (this time) I then conditioned my hair with the Rosemary Mint conditioner. This conditioner is pretty thick, too (though not quite as thick as I was expecting, considering the shampoo). Normally I dilute my conditioners, too.

Once my my wash and condition is complete (should have also done an ACV rinse, but I didn’t), I dried my hair, separating the individual locks. I used EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) to give myself a hot oil treatment (but I also like to use Carol’s Daughter’s Lisa’s Hair Elixer) and then I started to maintain my locks.

I have dry scalp, so I almost always oil my scalp prior to doing my maintainance. Currently I am using Taliah Waajid’s “The Strengthener” hair oil. It’s medicated, so it has a heavy scent and it tingles. Have to admit, I LOVE the tingle! 🙂 I use this hair oil on my entire scalp, then I proceed to palm rolling (Palm rolling is a method for tangling the roots of your dreads and helping them knot and tighten. It works much better than “twisting” with the fingers. To palm roll you simply grab the dread between the base of your palms – tightly by the root – and roll it in a single direction – I prefer counter-clockwise. It’s a bit like rolling Play-Doh between your palms to make a long rope. You are doing two things at once: tightening the root of your lock that has come unraveled and you are shaping the rest of that same dread into a cylinder shape. Palm rolling works well anytime but the best time to palm roll is right after washing/co-washing your dreads).

When doing maintainance, I always keep a few things on hand. One items is some type of oil based moisturizer lotion. I’ve used several different brands of several different things, but one of the ones I love best is Carol’s Daughter Hair Milk. I’ve used it off and on for years. Another great item that I like to keep on hand while doing my hair is a water based hair spray/detangler/leave in conditioner. I’m currently using Johnson & Johnson Maintainance for dreadlocks is really best done on moist or wet hair. Depending on how long it takes your hair to dry compared to how long it takes to do your hair will let you know if you need to re-wet your hair while completing maintainance.

Since this is a bridal hair style trial, I decided to set my hair in the manner in which I plan to wear it. Since it is over one shoulder to the side, that is exactly how I set it. I made sure that I palm rolled AND set my hair in that same direction.

Setting Hair - Front

The way I set my hair for this trial was what I call a wet “braid out.” I call it this because I set my hair while wet by braiding it. The “out” part comes because I take out the braids (simple, I know 🙂

Setting Hair - Profile 2


Setting Hair - Back

After I set my hair I usually do one of two things. I either let my hair dry naturally and leave the set in for 24-48 hours OR I sit under a hood dryer for 3-5 hours.

Once my hair is completely dry, I removed the braids.

Braid Out - Front

Braid Out - Front


The set worked VERY well, if I say so myself :-). I love the fact that the hair is slightly molded in a side position. One of the things I noticed, however, is that my hair doesn’t really want to stay that way. The weight of my hair makes it want to fall away from the one shoulder look. I held it in place with a few strategically placed hair pens.

Braid Out - Profile 2


While I think my hair has come out pretty nice – I’m also glad that my friend Glenda will be there on my big day to actually STYLE my hair!